Book Chapter: Papakāinga Design - Principles and Applications in Our Voices: Indigeneity and Architecture

Book Chapter: Papakāinga Design - Principles and Applications in Our Voices: Indigeneity and Architecture

Our Voices: Indigeneity and Architecture is an exciting advance in the field of architecture offering multiple indigenous perspectives on architecture and design theory and practice. Indigenous authors from Aotearoa NZ, Canada, Australia, and the USA explore the making and keeping of places and spaces which are informed by indigenous values and identities.

Te Rewarewa Whenua Concept Plan [in progress, to be completed May 2018]

Te Rewarewa Whenua Concept Plan [in progress, to be completed May 2018]

Te Rewarewa is the largest Māori land block within the central Whangarei area and has the potential to become a focal point for regional economic development, a driver of future urbanisation and growth within the Whangarei C.B.D., and a model for the re-establishment of Kāinga as the primary social and economic unit in Te Taitokerau. 

Liminal Spaces

Liminal Spaces

This installation project uses multiple overlapping strands to form a dialogous interrogation of the narratives associated with gendered and liminal spaces, the process of image-making and place-making, and collaborative influences within art and architecture. The work constitutes a fertile visual response to the themes, using space, lighting, tension and gender to construct images and spaces.

1:1

1:1

In printmaking a “1:1” is a monoprint, a singular work of art. In architecture, “1:1” refers to a full-scale drawing or model. This project provided an opportunity to reflect on our shared experiences of colonisation and the impact of missionary activity across the Pacific, and provided a space to reflect on the role of spirituality as we move into an increasingly secular society. Ideas of space, light and sound and the use of transparent and lightweight materials helped us to tell stories of spirituality, tradition, navigation and culture.  

Pehiāweri Marae papakāinga: a model for community regeneration in Te Tai Tokerau (Master's thesis)

Pehiāweri Marae papakāinga: a model for community regeneration in Te Tai Tokerau (Master's thesis)

This thesis by design explores the ways in which architecture can facilitate the reconnection of Māori people to their lands, and the resumption of ahi kā (or, a living presence). This project is based on the philosophy that housing solutions for Māori should be integrated with economic and social development initiatives that are co-created and co-designed with the community. Through this research, the papakāinga concept has been explored as a model for the cultural, social, economic and environmental regeneration of communities in Aotearoa New Zealand, and implemented through the design of a papakāinga project located at Pehiāweri Marae in Glenbervie, Whāngarei, Aotearoa New Zealand.

Chapel Pacific

Chapel Pacific

Chapel Pacific consists of the design, building, and adorning of a small structure that references systems of faith for the diverse communities of the Pacific ocean. It is a collaboration between architects, builders, and fine art printmakers; and open to the public irregardless of faith, age or background. The project is to be created, and re-created, in spaces for contemporary art. The physical context of art museums allow its creators to focus on the process of a chapel rather than its use, and on its creation rather than its dedication.